site image
Farming Rural 20

       


Dwight W. Huber

September 22, 1944 ~ May 24, 2019 (age 74)

Dwight W. Huber, known to some as “Dwight White, the fighting Knight of Write” died on May 24, 2019 at the age of 74.

Dwight was an exceptional wordsmith who lived his life with the understanding of Mark Twain’s words, “The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and a lightning bug.”

We hope that he would approve of his family’s attempt to capture a life well-lived.  We really wish he were here to help write this as he always knows how to captivate an audience.

A native of Amarillo, Texas, Dwight graduated from Tascosa High School and Texas Tech University.  He graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in English and received a Master’s degree from WTSU.  His love of teaching and literature started at a very young age when his mother, also a teacher, taught him to read at the age of three.

He began his teaching career as an instructor of English at Pan American University in Edinburg ,TX. From 1978-1982, he was an English teacher and Department Chair at Amarillo High. He then moved to Amarillo College as an English professor for 29 years. He began and directed the honors program.  Dwight served as Chairman of the AC Self Study Committee to prepare for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 10 Year Accreditation visit and review.  He served as chairman of the department of English and numerous committees at Amarillo College.  He was admired and respected by faculty and students and served as a mentor to many. 

Dwight’s true passion in life was teaching and he always enjoyed visits from former students.  While dining out, shopping, having coffee, we often encountered many who were fortunate to have had Dwight as a professor and they would share how he inspired them.   

He also loved the study of the American West and was a longtime member of Westerners International. He made a mark in the Western Collectibles World.  You may have even encountered him in Lonesome Dove as the “Spur Collector from the Valley”.

He was fond of trading collectibles and making “deals”.  He had a keen eye for Western Collectibles and antiques, something he and his wife Linda enjoyed together.  He was well known for his spur and boot collection which also made an appearance at the Panhandle Plains Historical Museum.

Dwight is survived by his wife, Linda, who he married 21 years ago.  We were so happy to see Linda and Dwight reconnect as he brought the life back into her. They loved to intellectually spar with one another which led to many moments of laughter.  They loved making quick trips to Corrales, New Mexico and hitting up Trader Joe’s before heading back home.  They shared the love of reading, cooking, playing cards, crossword puzzles; and he wrote her poems to capture moments they shared together, and these words from one of his many poems written to Linda capture the lasting legacy of their relationship:

The rest is history, as they say, and

I can count my days

With you in blessings, one by one,

And day by day

Dwight is also survived by his mother Frances Huber, his son, Jason and his wife, Mary, their children Maya and Kai-Liang of Denton, TX.  Jason and Dwight shared a witty sense of humor and a passion for teaching; daughter, Maggie Huber of Austin, TX; three bonus daughters, Janessa Kennedy and her husband Trent of Amarillo, TX. Dwight was an inspiration to Janessa who is also an educator in Amarillo; Sarah Kennedy and husband Tom of Austin, TX, and Lyn Manley and husband Todd of Katy, TX and their three children.

Services will be held Thursday, May 30 at 10:30 AM at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Amarillo.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Banner Alzheimer’s Foundation at www.banneralz.org or a charity of your choice.

“Until we meet again, may the good Lord take a liking to you” - Roy Rogers

© 2019 Brooks Funeral Directors. All Rights Reserved. Funeral Home website by CFS